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Birmingham

How to Make a Vision Board

If you’re like me, you are so excited about 2018 you could pop! You’ve set your goals for the New Year and even drafted plans on how to achieve those goals and you are ready to slay 2018!

But New Year’s Day will come and go, life will happen and your goals will get pushed to the back burner. Or at least that’s probably what has happened in the past. But we’re not going to let that happen in 2018 because we’re going to manage our mindset.

Related Reading: How to Manage Your Mindset

One way to do this is by creating a 2018 vision board and hanging it in a prominent place in your home or office. This vision board should be a visual representation of the vision you have for your year.

On Saturday, January 6 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Homewood Public Library I am hosting a vision board party with Black Bloggers United Birmingham. This is a free event, but registration is required. You can RSVP here.

If you can’t make it to the event or if you want a preview of what we’ll be doing, here are my 3 steps to creating a vision board that will keep you motivated throughout the year.

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See Jane Write founder featured by Sleepover Media

What made me a happy feminist this week? Being featured as a Bama Boss Babe by Sleepover Media.

Sleepover Media began by hosting events that quickly became dubbed as Birmingham’s “best girls’ night out” but grew into a local boss babe collective seeking to amplify the voices of women in the arts, entertainment, fashion, beauty, and business.

One way the women of Sleepover Media are setting out to celebrate local lady bosses is through their Bama Boss Babe video series. It was an honor to be featured in the latest edition.

What made you a happy feminist this week?

Her Story project seeks to empower women of Birmingham and beyond

Emily Smith and Mary Beth Gore

We women are our own worst critics—if you’re a woman, you’ve probably heard this before. And maybe this statement made you angry because you disagree. Or maybe it filled you with sorrow because you can say from first-hand experience that it’s true. When Mary Beth Gore heard this statement while watching the documentary Miss Representation, she decided to do something about it. She decided to start Her Story, a series of profiles on women with a connection to the Birmingham area.

“I want all women to know their story matters,” says Gore, a 24-year-old social worker. “It is a very empowering experience for a woman to share her story and know that it’s meaningful.”

Instead of criticizing other women Gore wants to uplift women by helping their voice be heard. She teamed up with Emily Smith to help her with Her Story, which they launched in January. Over the year Gore and Smith have shared stories of women of different age groups and different walks of life—from stories of women who have survived gunshot wounds and battled eating disorders to stories of college students and stay-at-home moms.

For my latest column for B-Metro I had a chat with Gore and Smith about the Her Story project. You can read it here.

Also on December 1 at 6 p.m. at the Christ City Center in Bessemer, Gore and Smith will host Her Story Celebration, an evening celebrating one year of stories. The evening will include dinner, time to explore vendor booths featuring women-owned businesses, and a panel discussion with some of the women featured in the Her Story project this year. Tickets are $10 in advance via EventBrite.com and $15 at the door. All proceeds will benefit Grace House Ministries. You can order your tickets here.

What the Vulcan Run 10K Taught Me About Writing & Blogging

This weekend, for the first time ever, I participated in the Vulcan Run, a 10K race held annually in Birmingham that attracts about 1,000 runners each year.

I have never been more nervous for a race. I couldn’t really figure out why. I’ve run a half-marathon — twice — which is more than twice the number of miles of a 10K. I also trained for this race for a month. Yet, the morning of the Vulcan Run I was so nervous my stomach started to hurt.

I was convinced I’d be too slow to finish the race in the two-hour time limit or that my legs would just stop working around mile five.

Nevertheless, I laced up my Nikes and set off to pound the pavement. This race, like so many others, would not only teach me plenty about running but impart lessons about writing, too.

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